Staying Fit as You Age

Exercise is often prescribed for patients of all ages to reduce complaints about pain in muscles and bones. But some feel it gets harder to exercise as they get older. The following tips will help you exercise more effectively as you age, making you feel better.

I’ve been inactive for so long. Won’t it hurt to exercise?
You can always become as physically fit as possible, given your current health status and limitations. When you commit to a physical fitness program, you will move toward enjoying life more fully.

First, pick an activity that you enjoy doing and perform it regularly. Make your exercise program as pleasant a possible. If you feel exercising is a chore, you will be uncomfortable with the program and will quit. If you can, ask a friend to exercise with you so you can support each other.

Second, begin your exercise program gradually, starting with five minutes of exercise each day. As you become more comfortable with the routine and notice the positive effects of fitness, you may increase the exercise time.

If you have been inactive for some time, you may feel some small aches and pains. The will fade with time. Be sure to tell your doctor if you experience any unusual pain or other symptoms while or after performing your exercises.

Check with Dr. Grgula and the doctors at Accurate Care Pain Relief Center or other health care providers before starting any exercise or physical fitness program. While exercise is beneficial to your health, depending on your health status, the type of exercises you perform can have profound effects on your health, both good and bad.

I have arthritis. How can I exercise safely?
Many people with rheumatic conditions are physically inactive. Prolonged periods of inactivity, however, will often make your joints stiff and painful. But, in most cases, you can – and should – exercise. In fact, recent research has shown that older people with arthritis gain modest improvements in physical function, pain, general mobility, and flexibility when participating in long-term exercise programs. Water-based exercises, such as swimming or “water-walking”, can work on joints without putting them through the stress of weight bearing. If necessary, your doctor can show you how to use a cane, a walker, or other assistive devices to help prevent falls and injuries while you are physically active.

What fitness program will help me most?
The best exercise program should be tailored to your individual health status. Dr. Grgula and the doctors at Accurate Care Pain Relief Center can help you plan the fitness program that is right for you. Typically, low-impact activities that keep joints moving and minimize pain, such as walking, swimming, and water-based exercise, are effective. Research has shown that exercise can reduce joint stiffness, pain, and inflammation associated with arthritic conditions, which affect most of us as we age.

– Courtesy of the American Chiropractic Association

For a complete brochure on this condition, please ask the staff at our office.